Review: My Big Bear, My Little Bear and Me

In this precious story of a little girl and her two bears, Del Mazo takes readers on a simple, albeit wonderful, adventure that showcases a special relationship. The day is filled with experiences that each of her bears is instrumental in providing. Each activity is accompanied by Bonilla’s beautiful illustrations, offering us a striking visual representation of the child’s view of her bears.

Review: Ivy Bird

Imagination is an integral part of childhood; and yet, so often it is a lost art. Kids have become so dependent on electronic devices and technology, that the thought of using their imagination rarely even comes to mind as a possibility during play. Fortunately and perhaps as a response, McCartney gives us Ivy Bird, a beautiful portrayal of where your imagination can take you, if you allow it to take flight.

Review: My Ocean is Blue

An exuberant little girl takes readers on an ocean adventure using her senses to describe her ocean. Through her journey, we not only see what the ocean is, we also feel the sensory experience she feels. Our little girl, dependent on braces while on land, weaves a subtle but transformative narrative as she describes not only what her ocean is, but also what it represents.

Review: Margot and the Moon Landing

I had a hard time with this picture book; at first. I couldn’t get my head around it. Try as I may, I stumbled over and over its pages. And then I realized what was wrong. As an adult, I was meant to stumble. The book, in its brilliance, gives adults a candid look at how a child feels when she is completely ignored, set aside, and looked over– all in the guise of an innocent picture book. For children, it gives voice to their frustration. It teaches them to nevertheless, persist.

Review: I Am Brown

I am Brown is not a political book. Rather, it is a testament to everything Brown is; which is everything. Through simple recitation, it illuminates who a Brown child is, can be, and will be. It tells you that Brown people are everywhere and can do everything, With its gorgeous, rich, vibrant illustrations it is a simple, joyous celebration of being. And, although it is not a political book, it does make a political statement, albeit one that should not be political at all.

Review: Felix After the Rain

Winner of the English Pen Award (New & Exciting Literature into English) and part of Tiny Owl Publishing’s Hope in a Scary World series, Felix After the Rainbow, takes on a tough subject, dealing with the death of a loved one, and distills it to its most basic essence: dealing with the baggage left behind. This achingly beautiful book vividly illustrates how a child doesn’t cope, and does, and succeeds.

Review: Who’s Your Real Mom?

Which one is the real mother/father? A question often asked of samesex couples and their children when they are out in public? Sometimes the question is meant to provoke embarrassment; sometimes the question the question comes from curiosity; sometimes the question comes from fear. Regardless of how it arises, it’s a question the couple, and their child(ren) inevitably face.

Review: The Fabled Life of Aesop

There are numerous collections of Aesop’s fables on the market. Indeed, the stories are in the public domain, so a collection would have to be pretty special to warrant a good review. It would have to be extra special to warrant a purchase. Well, The Fabled Life of Aesop threads the needle beautifully, and I mean beautifully; using golden thread, illustrations and prose.

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