Review: A Sky-Bench

Aria, who received a “helper-leg” after an accident, is excited about returning to school after an extended absence. The school, however, has no places for her to sit, making her participation incredibly difficult. After almost giving up, Aria becomes determined to take matters into her own hands and solve the problem: she would build a bench for herself to use!

Review: My Rainy Day Rocket Ship

This book follows an inquisitive, precocious little Black boy as he battles boredom and a rainy day with his imaginative pretend play. It starts, of course, with a cardboard box, and rolls on from there – dishrags, socks, goggles, swimming trunks – nothing is spared on this little boy’s quest to launch his rocket ship, all through the day right into B-E-D!

Review: Rapunzel

“But where is the prince,” my son asked at the end of the story. “There isn’t one,” we answered. And so began the discussion at the end of Woolvin’s Rapunzel, an empowering take on the traditional damsel in distress story we’ve all heard (and told) over the years. In this Rapunzel, Rapunzel doesn’t need saving. She figures everything out, all on her own.

Review: Little Moar and the Moon

There is a reason why I use this small, Inuit-owned, publisher as a reliable go-to for birthday gifts. Inhabit Media is a wonderful resources for developmentally appropriate, fun, accessible, stories that you would not otherwise find in the “big” publishing houses. Little Moar and the Moon is one such example.

Review: A Jedi You Will Be (Star Wars)

With whimsical yet warm drawings deftly bringing Dagobah to life (you know, where Yoda trained Luke) Deas provides an engaging backdrop for an engaging story about becoming a Jedi. It is not, as one might first suspect, Luke’s story. But rather, Chhibber breaks the fourth wall and talks to the child directly, using Yoda, thereby guiding the reader on the path to Jedidom.

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